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The Kennet And Avon Canal

Ian Lewis | Towpath Into Hungerford

Towpath Into Hungerford

The towpath by the Kennet and Avon Canal leading eastwards into the town of Hungerford in West Berkshire. During the mid 1800s, this was a thriving industrial area lined with canalside industrial buildings. Boats would have been busy loading and unloading goods such as Bath stone for building the new mansions in London. The canal was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to link the Thames at Reading with Bristol, enabling goods to be transported smoothly from London to Bristol.
Ian Lewis | The Kennet and Avon Canal at Pewsey

The Kennet and Avon Canal at Pewsey

The Kennet and Avon Canal as it passes through the village of Pewsey in Wiltshire. This is the scene just above the bridge at Pewsey Wharf with narrow boats moored on the northern bank. This section of the canal was opened in 1810. The Kennet and Avon was designed to join Reading with Bristol and was constructed between 1794 and 1810. The coming of the Great Western Railway however spelt the end of the canal and it gradually fell into disuse.After restoration it was fully opened again in 1990.
Ian Lewis | Under The Bridge At Pewsey Wharf

Under The Bridge At Pewsey Wharf

The view from under the bridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal at Pewsey Wharf in Wiltshire. On a hot summer's day, narrow boats are moored along the canal side and the water reflects on the warm red bricks of the bridge. The canal reached here in 1810 when the wharf would have been a hive of industrial activity. The construction of the Great Western Railway which arrived at Pewsey in 1862 resulted in the canal falling into disuse. Following restoration, however, it fully reopened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | Painting Pewsey Bridge

Painting Pewsey Bridge

Looking westwards from beneath the canal bridge over the Kennet and Avon at Pewsey in Wiltshire. An artist has set up his easel and is capturing the scene in watercolours. Along the north bank narrowboats are moored whilst the towpath winds alongside the canal's southern side. This K & A canal was constructed between 1794 and 1810, this section being completed in 1810. This meant that goods could be smoothly transported to and from Bristol via Reading to London, the midlands and the north.
Ian Lewis | Narrow Boats At Woolhampton

Narrow Boats At Woolhampton

Two narrow boats on the Kennet and Avon Canal moored just downstream from Woolhampton in West Berkshire. The image was captured in early March on a bright and calm late winter afternoon. The Kennet and Avon Canal, 87 miles long, was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to link the Kennet and Avon rivers and thus provide a smooth transport link between Bristol and London via Reading. It fell into disuse due to the Great Western Railway but was completely restored and reopened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | An Autumn Afternoon At Hungerford

An Autumn Afternoon At Hungerford

A lived-in narrowboat moored on the Kennet and Avon Canal at Hungerford in Berkshire, England. This image was captured on a sunny autumn afternoon with the still water reflecting the trees. The Kennet and Avon Canal, 87 miles long, was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to link the Kennet and Avon rivers and thus provide a smooth transport link between Bristol and London via Reading. It fell into disuse due to the Great Western Railway but was completely restored and reopened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | The River Kennet At Burghfield

The River Kennet At Burghfield

A stretch of the River Kennet at Burghfield in Berkshire,as it winds its way towards Reading. This is a navigable stretch of the river which forms part of the Kennet and Avon Canal. Here it is quiet after flowing under the roaring traffic of the M4. A little further on it passes Burghfield Mill, a large Georgian building now converted to flats. The Kennet and Avon was constructed in the early 1800s to connect Bristol with London via Reading, mainly to carry Bath stone for buildings.
Ian Lewis | Hungerford Town Wharf And Lock

Hungerford Town Wharf And Lock

The wharf at Hungerford on the Kennet and Avon Canal in Berkshire. This view is from the town bridge looking upstream to the lock. A pair of boats are about to moor at the wharf. During the mid 1800s, this was a thriving industrial area lined with buildings. Boats would have been busy loading and unloading goods such as Bath stone for building. The canal was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to link the Thames at Reading with Bristol, enabling goods to be transported from London to Bristol.
Ian Lewis | Passing Through Woolhampton Lock

Passing Through Woolhampton Lock

A narrow boat has just passed through Woolhampton lock on the Kennet and Avon Canal at Woolhampton in Berkshire, England. This lock was constructed between 1718 and 1723 under the supervision of the engineer John Hore of Newbury. It was part of the Kennet Navigation - that is part river and part canal. The Kennet and Avon canal was constructed to join Bristol and London via Reading making the transport of goods smoother. It closed due to the Great Western Railway but was reopened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | Reflections At West Mills Newbury

Reflections At West Mills Newbury

The Kennet and Avon Canal at West Mills in Newbury with a narrow boat passing through the swing bridge. This image was captured on a June evening just before a rainstorm.
Ian Lewis | Weavers Cottages Newbury

Weavers Cottages Newbury

The Weavers' Cottages stand on the towpath of the Kennet and Avon Canal in Newbury, Berkshire, just upstream from West Mills. Newbury was once famous for its cloth making with both the wool and finished product being transported along the canal by narrow boat.
Ian Lewis | Narrowboat On The Kennet And Avon

Narrowboat On The Kennet And Avon

A narrowboat heads upstream on the Kennet and Avon canal near Woolhampton in Berkshire, England. This image was captured on an autumn afternoon with the trees lining the banks turning to gold. The Kennet and Avon Canal, 87 miles long, was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to link the Kennet and Avon rivers and thus provide a smooth transport link between Bristol and London via Reading. It fell into disuse due to the Great Western Railway but was completely restored and reopened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | The Towpath to Pewsey Bridge

The Towpath to Pewsey Bridge

Walking along the towpath and approaching the bridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal at Pewsey in Wiltshire, England. On a hot summer afternoon narrowboats are moored along the bank and an artist is painting a watercolour of the bridge. The Kennet and Avon Canal was constructed between 1794 and 1810, this section dating from 1810. The coming of the railway resulted in it falling into disuse until the mid 1900s when it was restored. It was fully opened again in 1990.
Ian Lewis | Living On The Kennet and Avon

Living On The Kennet and Avon

A scene just above Woolhampton in Berkshire on the the Kennet and Avon Canal. Narrow boats, several with log fires burning on board, moored above the lock. This was photographed on a sunny March afternoon. The Kennet and Avon or K&A was constructed in the first half of the 18th century to joinn London to Bristol. After falling into disuse from the end of the 19th century, it was restored in the late 1900s and is now busy with leisure boat traffic.
Ian Lewis | The Swan Family Visiting Hungerford

The Swan Family Visiting Hungerford

A swan family on the grassy slope of the wharf near the town centre of Hungerford in Berkshire, England.This lovely market town, famous for its many antique shops has the Kennet and Avon Canal flowing through its centre. In the mid 1800s the wharf area would have been a hive of activity with boats loading and unloading at the industrial buildings here The canal, 87 miles long, was constructed in 1794 -1810 to link Bristol with the River Thames at Reading giving a direct link to London.
Ian Lewis | The Kennet And Avon In Newbury

The Kennet And Avon In Newbury

The River Kennet, here part of the Kennet and Avon Canal, flowing eastwards through the centre of Newbury in Berkshire on its way to join the Thames at Reading. Here it has just passed through the Town Lock and is flowing under the Town, or Water Bridge as it is known. Newbury, now the administrative centre of West Berkshire, was, in medieval times, famous as a centre for making woollen cloth. The K&A canal seen here was finally opened between Reading and Bristol in 1810.
Ian Lewis | Artist At Pewsey Bridge

Artist At Pewsey Bridge

An artist creating a watercolour of the scene through the canal bridge at Pewsey Wharf in Wiltshire. Here the Kennet and Avon Canal passes through on its journey between the Thames at Reading and the Bristol Channel. It incorporates parts of both the Rivers Kennet and Avon in parts known as 'navigations'. The canal was constructed between 1724 and 1810 and was a commercial waterway until the coming of the Great Western Railway. It was restored in the mid 1900s and was finally reopened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | Kennet and Avon At Sulhamstead

Kennet and Avon At Sulhamstead

Just below the swing bridge carrying the road over the Kennet and Avon Canal at Sulhamstead, Berkshire. The surrounding buildings are reflected in the water and the whole scene is bathed in late afternoon sunlight. The Kennet and Avon Canal, 87 miles long, was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to link the Thames and Avon rivers, providing a smooth transport link between Bristol and London via Reading. The canal, once almost derelict, was restored in the late 1900s, being fully opened in 1990.
Ian Lewis | The Kennet and Avon Canal near Theale

The Kennet and Avon Canal near Theale

A stretch of the Kennet and Avon Canal as it passes close to the village of Theale in West Berkshire. Taken in late autumn, these houses are on the canal bank near Sheffield Lock and the swing bridge. The canal was constructed between 1794 and 1810 to join the Thames at Reading with Bristol, following the courses of the rivers Kennet and Avon. The Great Western Railway subsequently took most of the goods transportation and the canal gradually fell into disuse before being recently restored.