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River Thames

Ian Lewis | Over The Thames To Streatley

Over The Thames To Streatley

The view from the north bank of the River Thames at Goring in Oxfordshire,looking across to Streatley village and Streatley Hill, or Lardon Chase in Berkshire. Here the Thames flows between the North Wessex or Berkshire Downs to the south and the Chiltern Hills to the north, this feature being known as the Goring Gap. The weirs here once provided the power for water mills and now control the flow of the river. Only one working mill survives, further downstream at Mapedurham.
Ian Lewis | Christchurch Footbridge Reading

Christchurch Footbridge Reading

The new foot and cycle bridge over the River Thames at Reading, Berkshire just upstream from the busy road crossing at Reading Bridge. The footbridge, named Christchurch Bridge as the result of a poll, links Caversham to the north with Reading and in particular the station on the south bank. The name reflects historic links with Christchurch Cathedral in Oxford. The bridge was opened in 2017 by the Mayor of Reading with an inaugural game of poohsticks!
Ian Lewis | Caversham Bridge in Reading

Caversham Bridge in Reading

Caversham bridge, built in 1926, spanning the River Thames at Reading, Berkshire. It connects Reading with Caversham on the river's north bank. There has been a bridge here since the 1100s and in 1231 it is mentioned by Henry III who notes the presence of a chapel on the bridge on the side owned by William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke. There was a skirmish here during the Civil War when the Reading side had a wooden drawbridge which was later painted by JMW Turner.
Ian Lewis | Goring-on-Thames Weir

Goring-on-Thames Weir

Looking upstream from the road bridge, the weir at Goring on Thames in Oxfordshire. On the island to the right stands the white painted lock keeper's cottage, conveniently situated between the lock and weir. Here the Thames flows between the North Wessex or Berkshire Downs to the south and the Chiltern Hills to the north. This feature is known as the Goring Gap. Not surprisingly this stretch of the river is popular with both painting and photographic artists.
Ian Lewis | The River Thames At Streatley

The River Thames At Streatley

The River Thames as it flows between the villages of Streatley to the south and Goring to the north. This is a break between the North Wessex (Berkshire) Downs and the Chiltern Hills known as the Goring Gap. This is the view looking west from the bridge. Moored on the left is one of the old Oxford College barges - now an events venue for the hotel on the river bank. To the right the Thames rushes over the weir, boats passing through the lock. This is a popular scene with artists.
Ian Lewis | The River Isis At Oxford

The River Isis At Oxford

The Thames between Folly Bridge in Oxford and Iffley . A rowing boat is emerging from under the bridge which joins Boathouse Walk and Christ Church Meadow Walk. Next to this are some of the Oxford College boathouses on a stretch of the river famed for boat racing. Pleasure boats and punts are often to be seen here as well as rowing crews in training.
Ian Lewis |  Goring-on-Thames

Goring-on-Thames

The lock keeper's house on an island next to the lock at Goring on Thames, Oxfordshire. This is the view from the southerly river bank at Streatley on Thames in Berkshire. Linking these two villages is a fine iron bridge built in 1923 which can be seen in the background. Here the Thames flows through a gap in the hills - the Chilterns to the north and the North Wessex Downs to the south, This is thought to be one of the most beautiful; stretches of the river.
Ian Lewis |  Whitchurch on Thames Toll Bridge

Whitchurch on Thames Toll Bridge

The toll bridge at Whitchurch on Thames, spanning the river between Pangbourne in Berkshire and Whitchurch in Oxfordshire. There has been a bridge here since 1792, the present iron one, constructed in 1902 being the third. It is one of the few remaining toll bridges on the River Thames. From October 2013 until September 2014 the bridge was closed to traffic in order that it could be completely dismantled and refurbished.
Ian Lewis |  The Mill at Hambleden

The Mill at Hambleden

The water mill at Hambleden on the River Thames between Henley and Marlow in Buckinghamshire. This picturesque, Grade 2 listed old mill has a long history, having been mentioned in the Domesday Book when the the rental value was £1 per year! Its location is the appropriately named Mill End, where the fast flowing Hambleden Bourne discharges into the Thames. Immediately below it is the weir, one of the longest on the Thames. From here the Chiltern Hills gradually rise to the north.
Ian Lewis |  Thames Sunset

Thames Sunset

The sun setting over the River Thames just upstream from Marlow in Buckinghamshire, looking towards Bisham on the Berkshire side. This stretch of river is frequently busy with rowing, kayaking and canoeing crews training as both Marlow Rowing Club and the National Sports Centre at Bisham Abbey are close by. However, on this peaceful late afternoon, apart from the walkers on the Thames Path, there are only two rowing crews remaining on the river!
Ian Lewis | The Thames At Marlow

The Thames At Marlow

A view downriver at Marlow on Thames in Buckinghamshire captured on an autumn afternoon. The suspension bridge spanning the river was constructed in 1832 and was designed by William Tierney Clark' It was the prototype for the Szechenyi Bridge in Budapest and bears a plaque linking it with that city. The landmark church of All Saints was built in 1835, replacing a 12th century building demolished in 1802.
Ian Lewis | Early Evening In Marlow

Early Evening In Marlow

Marlow, on the north bank of the River Thames in Buckinghamshire, captured from just above the lock and weir late one afternoon in Autumn. The river leads the eye towards All Saints church, the spire being a distinctive landmark in the area. Also in the background is the suspension bridge constructed in 1832. Designed by William Tierney Clark, it was the prototype for the Szechenyi Chain Bridge crossing the Danube in Budapest.
Ian Lewis | The Thames Path At Cookham

The Thames Path At Cookham

The River Thames as it flows through the village of Cookham on its way to London and the sea. The Thames Path is a long-distance trail which follows the river all the way from Cricklade in the Cotswold Hills to the Thames Barrier in Greenwich, London. Cookham, on the banks of the Thames is a village lying in the furthest north-east corner of Berkshire, England. Here the artist Sir Stanley Spencer lived and set many of his paintings. This image captured on a late afternoon as shadows lengthened.
Ian Lewis | The Bridge At Culham Lock

The Bridge At Culham Lock

Properly named the Sutton Bridge Extension, this picturesque bridge carries the road from Culham to Didcot over River Thames. It was built in 1809 as an extension to the longer Sutton Bridge and spanning the lock cut. This is a very narrow bridge, traffic flow being controlled by lights.
Ian Lewis | Clifton Hampden

Clifton Hampden

The bridge crossing the River Thames at Clifton Hampden in Oxfordshire with the tollkeepers cottage on the far side. This narrow bridge with pedestrian refuges was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1867 to replace the ferry. It remained as a toll bridge until 1946. This view is from the Thames Path.
Ian Lewis | Hambleden Mill And Weir

Hambleden Mill And Weir

The lovely old mill at Hambleden on the River Thames in Buckinghamshire, sitting just above the exceptionally long weir. Walkers can cross the weir on a footway which leads to Hambleden Lock on the Berkshire bank. From here the Thames Path leads upstream to Henley on Thames and downstream to Marlow. The mill itself has ancient origins and was apparently mentioned in the Domesday Book! More recently it has been converted into flats.
Ian Lewis | De Montfort Island Reading

De Montfort Island Reading

De Montfort Island, or Fry's Island as it is also known is a natural island in the River Thames at Reading, Berkshire. On it is a private house, a bowls club and a boatyard - all only reachable by boat! It lies between Caversham Bridge to the west and Reading Bridge to the east. Apparently in c1163 it was the site of a trial by combat between Robert de Montfort and Henry of Essex, King Henry II's standard bearer. Henry of Essex lost and was taken to Reading Abbey, later becoming a monk.
Ian Lewis | Day's Weir at Little Wittenham

Day's Weir at Little Wittenham

After heavy rain, the Thames rushing through Day's Weir near Little Wittenham, Oxfordshire. The Thames Path crosses the river over the lock and weir, carrying on upstream towards Abingdon. Apparently the name for Day's Lock and Weir comes from that of a local Catholic yeoman in the 17th century.
Ian Lewis | Marlow on Thames

Marlow on Thames

A view of Marlow on Thames in Buckinghamshire looking downstream towards the suspension bridge. This bridge, opened in 1832 and designed by by William Tierney Clark links Buckinghamshire with Berkshire on the south bank. It is also the model for the Szechenyl Chain Bridge over the River Danube in Budapest. To the left is the parish church of All Saints which dates from 1835 and replaced a 12th century building which had been demolished. This stretch of the Thames is famous for rowing.
Ian Lewis | The River Thames At Marlow

The River Thames At Marlow

The scene from the Thames Path as it leads into Marlow on Thames in Buckinghamshire. Crossing the river behind the moored narrow boat is the iconic suspension bridge linking Buckinghamshire with Berkshire. Designed by William Tierney Clark it was opened in 1832 and is the prototype for the Szechenyl Chain Bridge over the River Danube in Budapest. To the left of the bridge is the landmark spire of All Saints Church which dates from 1835.
Ian Lewis | Above The Bridge In Abingdon

Above The Bridge In Abingdon

The River Thames just above the old bridge at Abingdon in Oxfordshire, England. The bridge dates back to 1422 when the first construction was completed. In 1453 three new arches were built and then the whole thing was widened bit by bit in the C19th. It's really two bridges linked by Nags Head Island seen on the left - on which a public house stands. This image shows the older,northern section, the southern, named Burford Bridge, having a wider arch. Further upstream is the lock and weir.
Ian Lewis | Beneath Reading Bridge

Beneath Reading Bridge

Standing under Reading Bridge which spans the River Thames, looking towards the northern, Caversham bank. This is a concrete single-span bridge connecting the town of Reading in Berkshire with Caversham. Originally there was just one bridge in the town - Caversham Bridge, - just further upstream. But as the main town absorbed the village of Caversham in the early 1900s, a new bridge was needed and this structure was finally opened in 1923.
Ian Lewis | A Backwater At Goring on Thames

A Backwater At Goring on Thames

A quiet backwater at Goring on Thames, Oxfordshire. Here the water is calm having rushed through the mill and now makes its way back to the main river. On the far bank is the church of St Thomas of Canterbury. Goring is a small village on the north bank of the Thames and is joined to Streatley on the south bank by an attractive road bridge. Here the river runs through the Goring Gap between the Chiltern Hills and the North Wessex Downs. The house in the background belonged to George Michael.
Ian Lewis | The River Thames At Sandford Lock

The River Thames At Sandford Lock

An Autumn scene on the Thames at Sandford Lock just south of Oxford. Taken late in the day during early November, the low sun intensifies the autumnal colours. Sandford lock is the deepest on the Thames and is also one of the oldest.
Ian Lewis | Abingdon on Thames

Abingdon on Thames

A view from just below the bridge of the River Thames as it flows past Abingdon on its way to Reading and London. Here the spire of St Helen's church dominates the scene - a well known landmark to users of the Thames. It inspired the artist JMW Turner who featured ii in a painting called 'Abningdon'. This ancient town is now in Oxfordshire although until relatively recently it was in Berkshire and was at one time the county town. Here is a popular mooring place for Thames boaters.
Ian Lewis | Wittenham Clumps Viewed From The Thames

Wittenham Clumps Viewed From The Thames

A view of Round Hill, one of the Wittenham Clumps - tree-crowned hills near Wallingford in Oxfordshire as seen from across the River Thames near Days Lock. The correct - ie not local - name for these is the Sinodun Hills, this being derived from an ancient Celtic word for 'fort'.
Ian Lewis | Boating At Bisham

Boating At Bisham

A pleasure boat taking its passengers along the River Thames passing the parish church at Bisham in Berkshire. The 12th century parish church of All Saints at Bisham stands on the banks of the Thames and is next door to Bisham Abbey, the national Sports Centre. Unsurprisingly, racing boat crews can often be seen training on the Thames here. The pleasure boat has probably come from the Buckinghamshire town of Marlow on Thames just downstream.