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Wales

Ian Lewis |  Pontsticill Reservoir Tower

Pontsticill Reservoir Tower

The valve tower next to the dam at the Pontsticill Reservoir in Powis, South Wales. Also known as the Taf Fechan Reservoir it is situated on the south side of the Brecon Beacons National Park and is within the Fforest Fawr Geopark. This gothic - styled valve house sits next to the dam and is adjacent to the bell-mouthed spillway. The lake is 2.5 miles long and covers 102 hectares - approximately 252 acres. A path leads round its shores and on the eastern side runs the Brecon Mountain Railway.
Ian Lewis |  An Anglesey Lane

An Anglesey Lane

A lane leading to the east coast on the island of Anglesey (Ynys Mon), North Wales. The sun is breaking through on a February afternoon giving a warm glow to the countryside and the old buildings on the hillside.
Ian Lewis | The Castle At Brecon

The Castle At Brecon

Looking across the River Usk as it flows through the market town of Brecon (Aberhonddu) in Powys, Wales, to the town's medieval castle. Beneath its walls the River Honddu discharges into the Usk - an ideal situation for a castle. This was one of the first stone castles in Wales, built by Bernard de Neufmarche in 1093. The Welsh, however, destroyed the town in the 1100s and so a stone shell keep and outer walls were built by the early 1200s. The section in the image dates from c.1300.
Ian Lewis | A Riverside Seat At Chepstow

A Riverside Seat At Chepstow

A bench overlooking the old road bridge at Chepstow, Monmouthshire in Wales. This graceful cast iron bridge crosses River Wye connecting Wales with Gloucestershire in England. Designed by John Rastrick of Bridgenorth, it is supported by enormous piers to withstand the force of the tidal flow. Here the water can rise and fall up to 14 metres - one of the highest ranges in the world!
Ian Lewis |  Bridge Over The Wye At Chepstow

Bridge Over The Wye At Chepstow

The bridge over the River Wye at Chepstow, (Cas-gwent), which links Gloucestershire in England with Monmouthshire (Sir Fynwy) in Wales. The sun is setting at the end of a late September day and the lamps on the bridge are gradually lighting up. Chepstow was a vital stronghold from Norman times when William I saw its importance as a frontier town. In the background can be seen the towers of the castle, originally built by William FitzOsbern in 1087.
Ian Lewis |  Nash Point Lighthouse Low Tower

Nash Point Lighthouse Low Tower

The Nash Point lighthouse on the Monknash coast of the Vale of Glamorgan in South Wales. Two towers were built in 1831-2, a low one in the west and a higher one on the eastern end of the complex to warn shipping of the dangerous Nash Sands below. Both worked together until 1920 when the low tower was decommissioned, the eastern lighthouse then doing both tasks. It was manned until 1998 when it became automatic.
Ian Lewis |  Nash Point East Tower

Nash Point East Tower

Nash Point lighthouse on the Monknash coast of the Vale of Glamorgan in South Wales. Two towers were built in 1831-2, a low one in the west and a higher one on the eastern end of the complex to warn shipping of the dangerous Nash Sands below. Both worked together until 1920 when the low tower was decommissioned, the eastern lighthouse then doing both tasks. It was manned until 1998 when it became automatic.
Ian Lewis |  The Brecon Beacons From Talybont Dam

The Brecon Beacons From Talybont Dam

Looking towards the Brecon Beacons from the dam at the northern end of the Talybont Reservoir in Powys, South Wales. In the foreground is the valve tower reflected in the almost still water. Built in the 1930s to provide water for Newport, this is the largest reservoir in the National Park covering an area of 318 acres (128.69 hectares). It now also generates electricity for the local community using water from the compensation flow.