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Sunset Through to Sunrise

Terri Waters | Sunset Over Penzance

Sunset Over Penzance

On a cold, sunshine and showers sort of day in January I watched from Long Rock Beach near Marazion as the glorious sky changed colour while the sun set over Penzance in Cornwall.
Terri Waters | St Michael's Mount A Dog And A Drone At Sunset

St Michael's Mount A Dog And A Drone At Sunset

While watching a wonderful sunset at Long Rock near Penzance in Cornwall with St Michael's Mount on the horizon I noticed a man was exercising his dog the easy way by flying his drone along the beach while his dog chased after it.
Terri Waters | Sunrise Over The Roseland Cornwall

Sunrise Over The Roseland Cornwall

I'm not usually up before the sun but one morning in October 2018 I was wide awake so decided to cycle up the hill to the field above Mylor Bridge and Restronguet to watch the sun come up over The Roseland Peninsular. I'm so glad I did as this golden sunrise will never be forgotten.
Terri Waters | Crantock Beach

Crantock Beach

The sand of Crantock beach viewed through a fence as the sun starts to set on the north Cornwall coast.
Terri Waters | Crantock From The Gannel

Crantock From The Gannel

Looking up the River Gannel towards Crantock Beach and the sea as the sun goes down. One of the most beautiful and most dangerous places in Cornwall, Crantock on the north coast is a popular spot with the flower covered cliffs of West Pentire above and the Gannel River flowing down the east side of the wide, dune backed beach. But there are strong, dangerous currents in the Gannel Estuary which separates Crantock from Pentire Point East and the town of Newquay. At high tide it is very easy to get cut off and at low tide quicksand can be a problem so be aware of the tide times and stay safe.
Terri Waters | The Gannel From Crantock

The Gannel From Crantock

Looking up the River Gannel from Crancock beach. One of the most beautiful and most dangerous places in Cornwall, Crantock on the north coast is a popular spot with the flower covered cliffs of West Pentire above and the Gannel River flowing down the east side of the wide, dune backed beach. But there are strong, dangerous currents in the Gannel Estuary which separates Crantock from Pentire Point East and the town of Newquay. At high tide it is very easy to get cut off and at low tide quicksand can be a problem so be aware of the tide times and stay safe.
Terri Waters | Sunset At Crantock

Sunset At Crantock

People walking their dog on the sand at Crantock beach north Cornwall as the sun sets behind the clouds over West Pentire.
Terri Waters | Pendennis Moonrise

Pendennis Moonrise

The Gyllyngvase beach side of Pendennis Castle is the perfect place to watch the moon rise over the sea.
Terri Waters | St Mawes Sunset

St Mawes Sunset

St Mawes is a beautiful castle on the Roseland in south west Cornwall any time of day, even more so at sunset. It sits majestically on the hill opposite it's larger partner, Pendennis Castle guarding the entrance of Falmouth Harbour and Falmouth Bay.
Terri Waters | Trevose Head Lighthouse

Trevose Head Lighthouse

Designed in the mid-19th century to bridge the gap in ship guidance in the Bristol Channel between the Longships lighthouse near Land’s End and Lundy off the coast of North Devon, Trevose Head lighthouse sits proudly on the headland warning passing ships of the dangerous coast. Trevose’s keepers’ cottages have now been converted into holiday lets, offering visitors a unique place to stay, with stunning views and a real understanding of being exposed to the elements, though ear plugs are recommended in times of fog!
Terri Waters | Evening In Porth Nanven

Evening In Porth Nanven

Porth Nanven at the seaward end of Cot Valley as the sun begins to set on another gorgeous day in Cornwall. Porth Nanven is Cornish for “port of the rocky valley”. It is also known as Pornanven, and colloquially as Cot Valley Beach and is a place undiscovered by most holiday makers but loved by photographers. It consists of a sandy beach covered with large rounded boulders, often described as dinosaur eggs, which not only cover the beach but raise majestically up the cliff behind forming a 120,000 year old backdrop to this beautiful location.
Terri Waters | Evening Light In Porth Nanven

Evening Light In Porth Nanven

The setting sun beyond The Brisons illuminates the dinosaur eggs on Porth Nanven Beach in the Far West of Cornwall near St Just. Porth Nanven, meaning “port of the rocky valley” and also known as Pornanven, and colloquially as Cot Valley Beach, consists of a sandy beach covered with large rounded boulders. These ovoid boulders have earned Porth Nanven the nickname “Dinosaur Egg Beach”, and are the work of the sea grinding the rocks to a smooth shape over the years. The cliff behind the beach also contains ovoid boulders, however these boulders were rounded by the sea and deposited around 120,000 years ago. This “raised beach”, or “marine terrace”, was formed by a drop in sea levels caused by melting of the ice sheets. Previously the sea would have been much higher, at the level where the raised beach is visible today. During very high spring tides the sea level can sometimes reach the raised beach and wash down some of the boulders.
Terri Waters | Porth Nanven Splashback

Porth Nanven Splashback

The tide coming in at sunset in the far west of Cornwall. Porth Nanven is Cornish for “port of the rocky valley”. It is also known as Pornanven, and colloquially as Cot Valley Beach and is a place undiscovered by most holiday makers but loved by photographers. Cot valley is a beautiful valley dissected by a narrow stream running northwest to the coast between Land’s End and Cape Cornwall. Porth Nanven at the seaward end of Cot Valley consists of a sandy beach covered with large rounded boulders, often described as dinosaur eggs, which not only cover the beach but raise majestically up the cliff behind forming a 120,000 year old backdrop to this beautiful location.
Terri Waters | Evening Glow At Porth Nanven

Evening Glow At Porth Nanven

As the sun sets over The Brisons it looks like General De Gaulle is enjoying a bath. The Brisons are a twin-peaked islet that is often said resembles Charles De Gaulle lying on his back one nautical mile offshore from Cape Cornwall and Porth Nanven. Porth Nanven Cove lies at the end of Cot Valley, a secluded area of beach with interesting geological features (giving it the nickname Dinosaur Egg Beach) and an extensive history associated with the St Just mining area and the perfect place to watch the sun go down.
Terri Waters | Brison's Sunset

Brison's Sunset

The sun setting over The Brisons seen from Porth Nanven Cove. The Brisons is a twin-peaked islet about a mile offshore that is often said resembles Charles De Gaulle lying on his back. Porth Nanven lies at the end of Cot Valley which has an extensive history associated with the St Just mining area in the far west of Cornwall. Porth Nanven is Cornish for “port of the rocky valley”. It is also known as Pornanven, and colloquially as Cot Valley Beach. It is a place undiscovered by most holiday makers as the cove is generally made up of boulders so it’s not ideal if you are hunting for golden sands but it is a location loved by photographers and dinosaur egg hunters.
Terri Waters | Sunset Tide

Sunset Tide

The sun setting over The Brisons seen from Porth Nanven Cove as the tide come in. Cot valley is a beautiful valley dissected by a narrow stream running northwest to the coast between Land’s End and Cape Cornwall. At the bottom of the sub-tropical valley you will find Cot Valley Beach, also known as Porth Nanven Cove.
Terri Waters | Porth Nanven Stone Stack

Porth Nanven Stone Stack

A stack of stones in the sun's evening glow precariously balanced among the dinosaur eggs of Porth Nanven Beach in the far west of Cornwall. The cove is generally made up of boulders so it’s not ideal if you are hunting for golden sands, but a small sandy beach does appear on a low tide and its a favourite spot for photographers as the sunsets here are spectacular.
Terri Waters | Photographer's Sunset

Photographer's Sunset

Photographers catching the last of the light as the sun goes down at Land End Cornwall. Lands End, a headland and small settlement in western Cornwall, is a good places to watch the sun set as it is the most westerly point of mainland Cornwall and England.
Terri Waters | Sun Setting At Porth Nanven

Sun Setting At Porth Nanven

A stone stack and the sun setting next to The Brisons off Porth Nanven in the far west of Cornwall. The Brisons is a twin-peaked islet about a mile offshore that is often said resembles Charles De Gaulle lying on his back in a bath.
Terri Waters | Sunset Stroll At Mounts Bay

Sunset Stroll At Mounts Bay

A person walks alone along the tide line at Long Rock between Marazion and Penzance in Cornwall at sunset.
Terri Waters | Sunset Stack

Sunset Stack

A stack of stones on Porth Nanven Beach at sunset. Offshore, a shapely double island named The Brisons provides a beautiful backdrop. Cot valley, near the mining town of St Just in the far west of Cornwall, is a beautiful valley dissected by a narrow stream running northwest to the coast between Land’s End and Cape Cornwall. At the bottom of the sub-tropical valley you will find Cot Valley Beach, also known as Porth Nanven Cove. Porth Nanven is special for many reasons but the abundance of large granite boulders shaped by the sea over thousands of years into smooth rounded stones resembling giant dinosaur eggs is perhaps the most peculiar.
Terri Waters | Standing Stones

Standing Stones

A stack of stones at Porth Nanven beach in the far west of Cornwall in the glow of the setting sun. The granite here provides wonderful cliffs; crumbled into impressive stacks, or smoothed by waves into gorgeous curves but what really makes Porth Nanven special is the abundance of large granite boulders shaped by the sea over thousands of years into smooth rounded stones resembling giant dinosaur eggs.
Terri Waters | Lifeguard Steps Crantock

Lifeguard Steps Crantock

The steps going down to Crantock beach from the lifeguard platform on the north Cornwall coast with West Pentire headland in the distance as the sun starts to set.
Terri Waters | Fields Of Gold Sunset

Fields Of Gold Sunset

The sun sets over the barley fields above Mylor Bridge on the south coast of Cornwall. It won't be long before those that enjoy a glass or two of Skinners Ales will be enjoying this crop in the local pubs.
Terri Waters | Standing Proud

Standing Proud

A stone stack on Porth Nanven Beach with The Brisons and a gorgeous sunset as a backdrop. Cot valley is a beautiful valley dissected by a narrow stream running northwest to the coast between Land’s End and Cape Cornwall. Porth Nanven at the seaward end of Cot Valley consists of a sandy beach covered with large rounded boulders, often described as dinosaur eggs, which not only cover the beach but raise majestically up the cliff behind forming a 120,000 year old backdrop to this beautiful location.