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Northumberland

John Ellis | Chollerford Bridge

Chollerford Bridge

A view of Chollerford Bridge, Northumberland spanning the River Tyne taken from the nearby public house.
John Ellis | Budle Bay

Budle Bay

Budle Bay on the Northumberland Coast is one of the most beautiful stretches of beaches, stretching to around 5 miles. It is also part of the Lindisfarne Nature Reserve and is home to large variety of bird life.
John Ellis | Budle Bay Pier

Budle Bay Pier

The remains of the old pier at Budle Bay which was once the loading bay for boats with material from a nearby quarry.
John Ellis | Seaton Sluice Harbour

Seaton Sluice Harbour

Once a busy port in its day, it is now a small tranquil in let. The harbour is a Grade II listed structure. It only caters for boats less than 9.1m long.
John Ellis | Craster Harbour

Craster Harbour

Craster is a small fishing village on the Northumbrian coast of England. It has a small harbour and offers a view northwards along the rocky shore to the ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle. This is the nearest point of access to the castle and the approach must be made on foot as there is just a grassy path. The next village to the north is Embleton.
John Ellis | Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle is a 14th-century fortification on the coast of Northumberland in northern England, between the villages of Craster and Embleton. The castle was built by Earl Thomas of Lancaster between 1313 and 1322, taking advantage of the site's natural defences and the existing earthworks of an Iron Age fort. Thomas was a leader of a baronial faction opposed to King Edward II, and probably intended Dunstanburgh to act as a secure refuge, should the political situation in southern England deteriorate. The castle also served as a statement of the earl's wealth and influence, and would have invited comparisons with the neighbouring royal castle of Bamburgh. Thomas probably only visited his new castle once, before being captured at the Battle of Boroughbridge as he attempted to flee royal forces for the safety of Dunstanburgh. Thomas was executed, and the castle became the property of the Crown before passing into the Duchy of Lancaster.
John Ellis | Craster Harbour

Craster Harbour

Craster is a small fishing village on the Northumbrian coast of England. It has a small harbour and offers a view northwards along the rocky shore to the ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle. This is the nearest point of access to the castle and the approach must be made on foot as there is just a grassy path. The next village to the north is Embleton.
John Ellis | Sunset Poppies

Sunset Poppies

Sunset over the poppy fields near Aydon Castle, Corbridge, Northumberland.
John Ellis | Sunset Remembrance

Sunset Remembrance

The popular poppy field at Aydon Castle near Corbridge basking in a glorious sunset
John Ellis | Close Up Poppy

Close Up Poppy

A close up shot of a wild poppy in the popular poppy fields near Corbridge, Northumberland
John Ellis | Simonside Shrouds

Simonside Shrouds

Shrouds of mist float below the Simonside Hills after an intense thunder storm.
John Ellis | Motherly Love

Motherly Love

A mare and her new foal share a peaceful moment together in the fields at Aydon Castle near Corbridge
John Ellis | Scarlet and White

Scarlet and White

Unusual white poppies in a huge field of red at Aydon Castle near Corbridge, Northumberland
John Ellis | Bamburgh Castle & Village

Bamburgh Castle & Village

An almost invisible Bamburgh Castle due to an intense sea fog. Image shows the castle just as the fog was lifting.
John Ellis | Hexham Bridge

Hexham Bridge

Hexham Bridge spanning the River Tyne during Autimn 2017
John Ellis | Hepburn Sunset

Hepburn Sunset

Sunset over the Simonside Hills from Hepburn Woods near Chillingham Castle, Northumberland
John Ellis | Bellingham Northumberland

Bellingham Northumberland

The market town of Bellingham sits on one of Northumberland's prettiest stretches of water, the north bank of the River North Tyne. This river runs through some of England's finest scenery as it follows its course below fells and across Forest Park where the waters are often shaded by wooded banks as it wends its way through rich grazing pastures. All around is quiet and tranquil, cattle graze and newborn lambs frollick. The beautiful stretch known as the Penine Way runs through south through Bellingham en route towards Hadrians Wall, it is in an area that is steeped in history dating back to the Bronze Age. This is evidenced by the finding of stone and bronze axes and a single burial cairn.
John Ellis | Bellingham

Bellingham

The market town of Bellingham sits on one of Northumberland's prettiest stretches of water, the north bank of the River North Tyne. This river runs through some of England's finest scenery as it follows its course below fells and across Forest Park where the waters are often shaded by wooded banks as it wends its way through rich grazing pastures. All around is quiet and tranquil, cattle graze and newborn lambs frollick. The beautiful stretch known as the Penine Way runs through south through Bellingham en route towards Hadrians Wall, it is in an area that is steeped in history dating back to the Bronze Age. This is evidenced by the finding of stone and bronze axes and a single burial cairn.
John Ellis | Hareshaw Linn

Hareshaw Linn

A 3 mile ‘there and back’ walk to visit the enchanting waterfall, Hareshaw Linn, in Northumberland. The walk leaves the village of Bellingham and follows the pretty stream, Hareshaw Burn, up along the gorge through beautiful woodland to reach the impressive waterfall.
John Ellis | Hareshaw Linn

Hareshaw Linn

A 3 mile ‘there and back’ walk to visit the enchanting waterfall, Hareshaw Linn, in Northumberland. The walk leaves the village of Bellingham and follows the pretty stream, Hareshaw Burn, up along the gorge through beautiful woodland to reach the impressive waterfall.
John Ellis | Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle occupies a strong defensive position on top of a long volcanic crag overlooking the North Sea. The site has been occupied since pre-historic times and, by the late Iron Age, was an important settlement of the Votadini tribe. A beacon was established on the site during the Roman era and it is possible Bamburgh acted as part of the warning system associated with the Saxon Shore defences (such as at Scarborough). By the late fifth/early sixth century a fortified settlement had become established at Bamburgh. This was captured in AD 547 by the Anglo-Saxon King Ida and thereafter Bamburgh evolved into the capital of the Kingdom of Bernicia. It remained an important caput even after that domain merged with Deira to become the Kingdom Northumbria. Bamburgh was attacked and destroyed by the Vikings in AD 993.
John Ellis | Seahouses Harbour

Seahouses Harbour

Seahouses lies on the Northumberland coast about 15 miles North-East of Alnwick between the beautiful Villages of Beadnell and Bamburgh. This holiday Town and Fishing Port did not exist until 1889 when the harbour was built in order to improve the local fishing and lime industries. Seahouses is known to many as 'The Gateway to the Farne Islands' and is a very popular place with both locals and visitors. It is probably the most popular holiday resort on the Coast due to it's excellent amenities and attracts huge numbers of visitors throughout the year.
John Ellis | Seahouses Harbour

Seahouses Harbour

Seahouses lies on the Northumberland coast about 15 miles North-East of Alnwick between the beautiful Villages of Beadnell and Bamburgh. This holiday Town and Fishing Port did not exist until 1889 when the harbour was built in order to improve the local fishing and lime industries. Seahouses is known to many as 'The Gateway to the Farne Islands' and is a very popular place with both locals and visitors. It is probably the most popular holiday resort on the Coast due to it's excellent amenities and attracts huge numbers of visitors throughout the year.
John Ellis | Beadnell Bay

Beadnell Bay

The beautiful and very popular Beadnell Bay Beach is situated in Beadnell, Northumberland. This is a beach that is distinctive because of its unique horseshoe shape and boasts soft golden sands. It is also a part of the Heritage Coastline, which gives it even more of a unique appeal for visitors. Beadnell Bay Beach offers a host of amenities and facilities for the convenience of visitors as well as offering access to a variety of activities.
John Ellis | Beadnell Harbour Cottgae

Beadnell Harbour Cottgae

Beadnell is a charming coastal village lying between rolling farmland and the dune fringed stretch of Beadnell Bay. Old cottages and pretty houses line the coastal road and in the summer the small harbour is filled with colourful boats. Beadnell is the only west-facing harbour on the east coast, making it an enchanting place to watch the sun set. The bay is home to an important colony of little and Arctic terns that can be seen swooping overhead.
John Ellis | Northumberland Coast at Bamburgh

Northumberland Coast at Bamburgh

A view from Trinity Lighthouse of the Northumberland Coast
John Ellis | Bamburgh Lighthouse

Bamburgh Lighthouse

Bamburgh Lighthouse was built by Trinity House in 1910 to guide shipping along the Northumberland coast and in the waters around the Farne Islands
John Ellis | Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle is a castle on the northeast coast of England, by the village of Bamburgh in Northumberland. It is a Grade I listed building. The site was originally the location of a Celtic Brittonic fort known as Din Guarie and may have been the capital of the kingdom of Bernicia from its foundation in c. 420 to 547. After passing between the Britons and the Anglo-Saxons three times, the fort came under Anglo-Saxon control in 590. The fort was destroyed by Vikings in 993, and the Normans later built a new castle on the site, which forms the core of the present one. After a revolt in 1095 supported by the castle's owner, it became the property of the English monarch.
John Ellis | Berwick Quayside

Berwick Quayside

The quayside at Berwick extends about 350m downstream from Berwick Old Bridge, on the northern bank of the River Tweed. It probably has its origins in medieval times and the earliest reference may date to 1333. Several 16th century maps show the quay following the same general outline as it does today. Little Dock and New Quay are shown on 18th century maps and by the 19th century there was a series of buildings on the quay. These include the Harbour Office, Berwick Shipping Company Office and Berwick Shipping Company and Newcastle Warehouse. A ramped approach road onto the quay was probably built in 1825 and would have meant the demolition of some quayside buildings, including the Harbour Office which was rebuilt against the ramp after this date.
John Ellis | Berwick Old Bridge

Berwick Old Bridge

Also known as Old Bridge, the 15-arch red sandstone Berwick Bridge is the most venerable of the three bridges crossing the River Tweed at Berwick on the Scottish-English border. It was the only bridge at this point for 300 years or so, and is now a Grade 1 listed structure and Scheduled Ancient Monument.
John Ellis | Tank Traps On Druridge

Tank Traps On Druridge

The last remnants of world war 2 defences along the northumberland coast.
John Ellis | Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle is a 14th-century fortification on the coast of Northumberland in northern England, between the villages of Craster and Embleton. The castle was built by Earl Thomas of Lancaster between 1313 and 1322, taking advantage of the site's natural defences and the existing earthworks of an Iron Age fort.
John Ellis | Coquet Island

Coquet Island

Situated off the Northumberland coast, Coquet Island is a vibrant seabird sanctuary, which is home to the UK’s only roseate tern breeding colony. It is also an important site for nesting puffins and common, Sandwich and Arctic terns.
John Ellis | Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle

Dunstanburgh Castle is a 14th-century fortification on the coast of Northumberland in northern England, between the villages of Craster and Embleton. The castle was built by Earl Thomas of Lancaster between 1313 and 1322, taking advantage of the site's natural defences and the existing earthworks of an Iron Age fort.