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Lighthouses

Steve Stamford | Roker lighthouse 1

Roker lighthouse 1

Roker lighthouse stands at the end of Roker Pier - a magnificent piece of engineering that between them took 18 years to complete. It guards the entrance to the harbour at Sunderland and the stripes are created by different rocks, not paint as is more traditional.
Steve Stamford | Smeatons tower

Smeatons tower

Smeaton's tower - quite probably the most famous lanmdmark in Plymouth
Steve Stamford | Hunstanton lighthouse

Hunstanton lighthouse

The old hunstanton lighthouse, oddly enough at Hunstanton in Norfolk, UK was built in 1840 and remained operational until 1922 and is now a holiday let.
Steve Stamford | Lighthouse light bulb

Lighthouse light bulb

One of three large light bulbs at Nash Point lighthouse, Wales, UK
Steve Stamford | Perch rock lighthouse

Perch rock lighthouse

Perch Rock lighthouse, also known as New Brighton lighthouse is in the estuary of the Mersey where it meets Liverpool bay. The lighthouse was first lit in 1830 and remained in use until 1973. No longer in active service it is well preserved and has been re-painted.
Steve Stamford | Talacre aerial 2

Talacre aerial 2

An aerial image of Talacre beach in Flintshire, Wales and the now disused Talacre (more properly known as Point of Ayr) lighthouse that overlooks the Irish sea. Built in 1776 and falling into disuse in 1884 it remains a popular place to visit and gets cut off from the land at each high tide. This image taken from my drone - I am CAA licensed for commercial operation, copy of PfCO certificate available on request.
Steve Stamford | Talacre Lighthouse

Talacre Lighthouse

An aerial image of Talacre beach in Flintshire, Wales and the now disused Talacre (more properly known as Point of Ayr) lighthouse that overlooks the Irish sea. Built in 1776 and falling into disuse in 1884 it remains a popular place to visit and gets cut off from the land at each high tide. This image taken from my drone - I am CAA licensed for commercial operation, copy of PfCO certificate available on request.
Steve Stamford | Talacre aerial 3

Talacre aerial 3

An aerial image of Talacre beach in Flintshire, Wales and the now disused Talacre (more properly known as Point of Ayr) lighthouse that overlooks the Irish sea. Built in 1776 and falling into disuse in 1884 it remains a popular place to visit and gets cut off from the land at each high tide. This image taken from my drone - I am CAA licensed for commercial operation, copy of PfCO certificate available on request.
Steve Stamford | Seaham lighthouse

Seaham lighthouse

Built in 1905 Seaham lighthouse is a 10m metal structure that marks the Seaham northern breakwater. It is no longer possible for the public to walk the pier following the removal of handrails in the 1960s but it is used as a private fishing club.
Steve Stamford | Perch rock lighthouse

Perch rock lighthouse

Perch Rock lighthouse, also known as New Brighton lighthouse is in the estuary of the Mersey where it meets Liverpool bay. The lighthouse was first lit in 1830 and remained in use until 1973. No longer in active service it is well preserved and has been re-painted.
Steve Stamford | Roker lighthouse 4

Roker lighthouse 4

Roker lighthouse stands at the end of Roker Pier - a magnificent piece of engineering that between them took 18 years to complete. It guards the entrance to the harbour at Sunderland and the stripes are created by different rocks, not paint as is more traditional.
Steve Stamford | Roker lighthouse 2

Roker lighthouse 2

Roker lighthouse stands at the end of Roker Pier - a magnificent piece of engineering that between them took 18 years to complete. It guards the entrance to the harbour at Sunderland and the stripes are created by different rocks, not paint as is more traditional.
Steve Stamford | Roker lighthouse 3

Roker lighthouse 3

Roker lighthouse stands at the end of Roker Pier - a magnificent piece of engineering that between them took 18 years to complete. It guards the entrance to the harbour at Sunderland and the stripes are created by different rocks, not paint as is more traditional.
Steve Stamford | Talacre lighthouse

Talacre lighthouse

Talacre beach is in Flintshire, Wales and overlooks the Irish sea. This lighthouse is properly known as Point of Ayr and was built in 1776 and fell into disuse in 1884.
Steve Stamford | Trwyn Du aerial

Trwyn Du aerial

Trwyn Du Lighthouse is situated on the Welsh coast at Penmon near to Puffin Island. Some 29 metres tall it is, like all offshore (wave washed) lighthouses in the UK now remote controlled. This image taken from my drone - I am CAA licensed for commercial operation, copy of PfCO certificate available on request.
Steve Stamford | Souter lighthouse

Souter lighthouse

Souter lighthouse despite its name is actually on Lizard Point in the village of Marsden and was the first to be designed to use the new fangled AC electricity. Decommissioned in 1988 it is now a popular tourist attraction
Steve Stamford | Looking up at Portland Bill

Looking up at Portland Bill

Portland Bill is one of many lighthouses on the UK. Its four flash every twenty seconds and distinctive red and white candy stripe has been aiding navigation since 1906 and remains active today. At a height of 135 feet it can been seen for around 25 nautical miles.
Steve Stamford | Portland Bill

Portland Bill

Portland Bill is one of many lighthouses on the UK. Its four flash every twenty seconds and distinctive red and white candy stripe has been aiding navigation since 1906 and remains active today. At a height of 135 feet it can been seen for around 25 nautical miles.
Steve Stamford | Low Lighthouse

Low Lighthouse

This is Low Lighthouse at Burnham-on-Sea in Somerset, UK. Standing on 9 piles, mainly wood but with some metal reinforcements it stands all of 11m (36ft) with the light being at 7m (23ft). It is there to warn seafarers of the dangers of the constantly shifting sands. I am CAA licensed for commercial drone operation.
Steve Stamford | Low Lighthouse landward

Low Lighthouse landward

This is the landward side of Low Lighthouse at Burnham-on-Sea in Somerset, UK. Standing on 9 piles, mainly wood but with some metal reinforcements it stands all of 11m (36ft) with the light being at 7m (23ft). It is there to warn seafarers of the dangers of the constantly shifting sands.
Steve Stamford | Low Lighthouse seaward

Low Lighthouse seaward

This is the seaward side of Low Lighthouse at Burnham-on-Sea in Somerset, UK. Standing on 9 piles, mainly wood but with some metal reinforcements it stands all of 11m (36ft) with the light being at 7m (23ft). It is there to warn seafarers of the dangers of the constantly shifting sands.
Steve Stamford | Nash Point lighthouse

Nash Point lighthouse

Nash Point lighthouse, Wales.
Steve Stamford | Talacre lighthouse textured

Talacre lighthouse textured

Talacre beach is in Flintshire, Wales and overlooks the Irish sea. This lighthouse is properly known as Point of Ayr and was built in 1776 and fell into disuse in 1884.
Steve Stamford | Talacre sunset

Talacre sunset

Talacre beach is in Flintshire, Wales and overlooks the Irish sea. This lighthouse is properly known as Point of Ayr and was built in 1776 and fell into disuse in 1884.
Steve Stamford | Walney lighthouse

Walney lighthouse

Still in service the Walney lighthouse we see here was completed in 1804. It remained virtually unchanged until 1903 when it was converted to run on acetylene, then the advent of electric light saw another upgrade in 1953. In 2003 it was automated and thus bought to a close manned lighthouses in the UK.
Steve Stamford | Mersey Planet

Mersey Planet

The Mersey Planet is a lightship, a floating lighthouse. Built in 1959 and of riveted steel construction it was originally positioned at the Mersey Bar - hence the BAR lettering down the side. Mixed fortunes have seen it be used in several marine locations and changes of hand before it was finally bought to Canning Dock in Liverpool where it now sees use as a club / bar and museum.
Steve Stamford | Tall, taller, tallest

Tall, taller, tallest

At the meeting of Liverpool Bay and the River Mersey you find blend of new and old - the lighthouse from 1827 and the towering cranes of the docks.
Steve Stamford | Two crane salute

Two crane salute

At the meeting of Liverpool Bay and the River Mersey you find blend of new and old - the lighthouse from 1827 and the towering cranes of the docks.
Steve Stamford | Nearly home

Nearly home

The suction dredger Lelystad at Liverpool Bay / River Mersey as it passes Perch Rock (New Brighton) lighthouse.
Steve Stamford | Choppy day at Perch Rock

Choppy day at Perch Rock

On a fine sunny summer day a strong wind whips up the waves to create a stunning foreground for Perch Rock (also known as New Brighton) lighthouse.
Steve Stamford | Perch Rock lighthouse

Perch Rock lighthouse

Perch Rock lighthouse (also known as New Brighton lighthouse) stands guard to the entrance of Liverpool Bay and the river Mersey. Decommissioned in 1973 it is now privately owned.
Steve Stamford | Tarbat Ness portrait

Tarbat Ness portrait

First put into commission in January 1830 Tarbat Ness was designed by Robert Stevenson and at a height of 135 feet is the third tallest in Scotland. Now automated, the keepers' cottages are now privately owned.
Steve Stamford | Looking up Tarbat Ness

Looking up Tarbat Ness

First put into commission in January 1830 Tarbat Ness was designed by Robert Stevenson and at a height of 135 feet is the third tallest in Scotland. Now automated, the keepers' cottages are now privately owned.
Steve Stamford | A day at Whitehaven Lighthouse

A day at Whitehaven Lighthouse

One of a couple of lighthouses at Whitehaven this is the more traditional looking and is at the end of the harbour wall. A popular place to fish from or simply just walk to it is a welcome sight to sailors as it marks the entrance to the harbour.
Steve Stamford | Whitehaven lighthouse lantern

Whitehaven lighthouse lantern

This close up of the lantern of Whitehouse Lighthouse. Amazingly this is still in use, giving off a green flash every 5 seconds.
Steve Stamford | Holyhead lighthouse

Holyhead lighthouse

At around 1.7 miles long Holyhead breakwater is the largest in the UK. Taking over 28 years to complete and making use of shaped 10 ton limestone blocks its construction cost 40 lives. It even had its own railway until the 1980s which was used for maintenance and creates a safe haven of approximately 400 acres. At the end of that breakwater is this lighthouse.
Steve Stamford | The new lighthouse

The new lighthouse

The new lighthouse was officially opened in 1961. This lighthouse, which stands at 43 metres, can be seen from a distance of 21 nautical miles. Like so many others it is now controlled remotely from Trinity House's centre in Harwich. To aid identification not only does it have the normal light, but a series of uplighters make it more easy to spot. The colour is cast into the concrete which in theory at least removes the need for painting in future.
Steve Stamford | The old lighthouse

The old lighthouse

The old lighthouse opened in 1904 and was finally decommissioned in 1960 as it was replaced by one much closer to the shore. It is now open to visitors and offers an amazing view for many miles. Constructed of engineering bricks around a centre core of a sandstone inner.
Steve Stamford | Tarbat Ness 2

Tarbat Ness 2

First put into commission in January 1830 Tarbat Ness was designed by Robert Stevenson and at a height of 135 feet is the third tallest in Scotland. Now automated, the keepers' cottages are now privately owned.
Steve Stamford | Whitehaven lighthouse

Whitehaven lighthouse

One of a couple of lighthouses at Whitehaven this is the more traditional looking and is at the end of the harbour wall. A popular place to fish from or simply just walk to it is a welcome sight to sailors as it marks the entrance to the harbour.